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Magma: What’s hot and what’s not

Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory routinely collect lava samples from Kilauea and use the chemistry of these samples to infer the temperature of magma (molten rock below Earth’s surface).

Magma: What’s hot and what’s not

Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory routinely collect lava samples from Kilauea and use the chemistry of these samples to infer the temperature of magma (molten rock below Earth’s surface).

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Threat rankings of our nation’s geologically young volcanoes

Careful readers of the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory website might have noticed mention of “threat rankings” in the lower right corner of our new home page (https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/observatories/hvo/). There, you’ll find a listing of Hawaii’s active volcanoes — Kilauea, Mauna Loa,

Threat rankings of our nation’s geologically young volcanoes

Careful readers of the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory website might have noticed mention of “threat rankings” in the lower right corner of our new home page (https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/observatories/hvo/). There, you’ll find a listing of Hawaii’s active volcanoes — Kilauea, Mauna Loa, Hualalai, Haleakala, Mauna Kea and Loihi — with their associated rankings, which range from “very high threat potential” to ”moderate threat potential,” and, in the case of Loihi, “not ranked.”

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USGS maps identify lava inundation zones for Mauna Loa

The primary goal of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is to provide scientific information to reduce risks due to volcanic and seismic activity. To this end, HVO scientists assess volcano hazards and inform the public and civic officials

USGS maps identify lava inundation zones for Mauna Loa

The primary goal of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is to provide scientific information to reduce risks due to volcanic and seismic activity. To this end, HVO scientists assess volcano hazards and inform the public and civic officials using media outlets, community forums, and other outreach activities.

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New Kilauea Volcano summit eruption video hits web

In March 2008, a new volcanic vent opened within Halemaumau, a crater at the summit of Kilauea in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. The eruption continues today, with continuous degassing, occasional explosive events, and an active, circulating lava lake.

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Thermal maps help with the pahoehoe challenge

Pahoehoe lava flows are a common feature on Hawaiian volcanoes, and they have been a serious hazard to residential areas during the Puu Oo eruption over the past few decades. Pahoehoe destroyed much of the town of Kalapana, buried most

New Kilauea Volcano summit eruption video hits web

In March 2008, a new volcanic vent opened within Halemaumau, a crater at the summit of Kilauea in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. The eruption continues today, with continuous degassing, occasional explosive events, and an active, circulating lava lake.