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January is Volcano Awareness Month on Hawaii

| | Dec 9 2017 - 9:53pm | Comments

With the hustle and bustle of the holidays upon us, Hawaii Island residents are likely giving little thought to the volcanic terrain beneath their feet. And that’s all right — for now.

  1. | Posted: Mar 25 2014 - 1:02am

    Mauna Loa, the world’s largest active volcano, has erupted many times — most recently three decades ago with lava coming within just miles of Hilo — and it will erupt again, posing a significant risk to those who call Hawaii Island home, a Hawaii Volcano Observatory geologist said Jan. 8.

  2. | Posted: Mar 23 2014 - 1:03am

    March 25 is the 30th anniversary of the most recent eruption of Mauna Loa, Hawaii Island’s largest volcano. According to historical records, Mauna Loa has erupted 33 times since 1843, an average rate of one eruption every five years. When we look at the past 3,000 years of Mauna Loa’s eruptive history, we see it has erupted about once every six years.

  3. | Posted: Mar 23 2014 - 1:03am

    March 25 is the 30th anniversary of the most recent eruption of Mauna Loa, Hawaii Island’s largest volcano. According to historical records, Mauna Loa has erupted 33 times since 1843, an average rate of one eruption every five years. When we look at the past 3,000 years of Mauna Loa’s eruptive history, we see it has erupted about once every six years.

  4. | Posted: Mar 16 2014 - 1:04am

    Six years is a blink of an eye in geologic time, but it can fly by for people, too. In a way, it doesn’t seem very long ago that the summit eruption began, with a small explosion that threw blocks around the Halemaumau Crater rim. On the other hand, so much has happened at the new vent that it is getting harder to remember what it was like when Kilauea Caldera was open to traffic and Halemaumau was quiet.

  5. | Posted: Mar 16 2014 - 1:04am

    Six years is a blink of an eye in geologic time, but it can fly by for people, too. In a way, it doesn’t seem very long ago that the summit eruption began, with a small explosion that threw blocks around the Halemaumau Crater rim. On the other hand, so much has happened at the new vent that it is getting harder to remember what it was like when Kilauea Caldera was open to traffic and Halemaumau was quiet.

  6. | Posted: Mar 9 2014 - 9:38am

    March 5, 2014, marked the third anniversary of the onset of Kilauea Volcano’s four-day-long Kamoamoa fissure eruption. This brief episode marked the end of the eruptive vent established east of Puu Oo in 2007 and presaged a return of activity to Puu Oo that continues today.

  7. | Posted: Mar 9 2014 - 9:38am

    March 5, 2014, marked the third anniversary of the onset of Kilauea Volcano’s four-day-long Kamoamoa fissure eruption. This brief episode marked the end of the eruptive vent established east of Puu Oo in 2007 and presaged a return of activity to Puu Oo that continues today.

  8. | Posted: Mar 2 2014 - 1:03am

    Soon after a large earthquake occurs, the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory publicizes the preliminary location and magnitude. Have you ever wondered why the location and magnitude of the event sometimes change? Or why it may take awhile to provide the final “reviewed” earthquake report on our website?

  9. | Posted: Mar 2 2014 - 1:03am

    Soon after a large earthquake occurs, the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory publicizes the preliminary location and magnitude. Have you ever wondered why the location and magnitude of the event sometimes change? Or why it may take awhile to provide the final “reviewed” earthquake report on our website?

  10. | Posted: Feb 23 2014 - 1:03am

    Ask a child to draw a volcano, and he or she will likely sketch a cone-shaped mountain erupting lava high into the air — with possibly a dinosaur or two thrown in for good measure. An older child might include a red blob under the mountain representing the volcano’s magma chamber. This child may be on his or her way to becoming a volcanologist. One of the most fundamental questions of volcanology today is: “How big is that red blob under the mountain?”

  11. | Posted: Feb 23 2014 - 1:03am

    Ask a child to draw a volcano, and he or she will likely sketch a cone-shaped mountain erupting lava high into the air — with possibly a dinosaur or two thrown in for good measure. An older child might include a red blob under the mountain representing the volcano’s magma chamber. This child may be on his or her way to becoming a volcanologist. One of the most fundamental questions of volcanology today is: “How big is that red blob under the mountain?”

  12. | Posted: Feb 16 2014 - 1:04am

    While most football fans have recovered from Super Bowl XLVIII, the most exciting time of year is just beginning for sled-dog-racing enthusiasts. As this article goes to press, the final finishers of the 1,000-mile Yukon Quest sled-dog race will have traversed the rugged Alaskan interior and crossed the finish line in Yukon, Canada.

  13. | Posted: Feb 16 2014 - 1:04am

    While most football fans have recovered from Super Bowl XLVIII, the most exciting time of year is just beginning for sled-dog-racing enthusiasts. As this article goes to press, the final finishers of the 1,000-mile Yukon Quest sled-dog race will have traversed the rugged Alaskan interior and crossed the finish line in Yukon, Canada.

  14. Posted: Feb 2 2014 - 1:02am

    We conclude our Volcano Awareness Month series on the important questions about how Hawaiian volcanoes work with an article on monitoring volcanic activity.

  15. Posted: Feb 2 2014 - 1:02am

    We conclude our Volcano Awareness Month series on the important questions about how Hawaiian volcanoes work with an article on monitoring volcanic activity.