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Drive along Saddle Road reveals outstanding volcanic geology

| | Nov 19 2017 - 8:43pm | Comments

Route 200, the Daniel K. Inouye Highway, crosses Humuula Saddle, which separates Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa, the two largest volcanoes on Hawaii Island. This Saddle showcases outstanding volcanic geology and is easy to reach for “roadside geologists.”

  1. Posted: Jan 12 2014 - 1:03am

    Welcome to Hawaii Island’s fifth annual Volcano Awareness Month. Throughout January, the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, in cooperation with Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, University of Hawaii at Hilo and Hawaii County Civil Defense, will offer public talks across the island. For more information about each talk, go to HVO’s website, hvo.wr.usgs.gov.

  2. Posted: Jan 12 2014 - 1:03am

    Welcome to Hawaii Island’s fifth annual Volcano Awareness Month. Throughout January, the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, in cooperation with Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, University of Hawaii at Hilo and Hawaii County Civil Defense, will offer public talks across the island. For more information about each talk, go to HVO’s website, hvo.wr.usgs.gov.

  3. | Posted: Jan 5 2014 - 1:03am

    On Friday, Kilauea’s Puu Oo eruption surpassed 31 years of activity. The ongoing eruption has evolved tremendously during its complex history. While it is impossible to recount in detail every episode of this long-lived east rift zone eruption in a Volcano Watch article, we mark its anniversary with a recap of highlights through the years.

  4. | Posted: Jan 5 2014 - 1:03am

    On Friday, Kilauea’s Puu Oo eruption surpassed 31 years of activity. The ongoing eruption has evolved tremendously during its complex history. While it is impossible to recount in detail every episode of this long-lived east rift zone eruption in a Volcano Watch article, we mark its anniversary with a recap of highlights through the years.

  5. | Posted: Dec 29 2013 - 1:02am

    During the course of an eruption, a volcano can produce a variety of hazards, such as lava flows, pyroclastic flows and lahars, volcanic mud flows. Latent hazards may exist for years after an eruption ends, and can reappear, seemingly out of nowhere, with deadly consequences — which is what happened in New Zealand 60 years ago.

  6. | Posted: Dec 29 2013 - 1:02am

    During the course of an eruption, a volcano can produce a variety of hazards, such as lava flows, pyroclastic flows and lahars, volcanic mud flows. Latent hazards may exist for years after an eruption ends, and can reappear, seemingly out of nowhere, with deadly consequences — which is what happened in New Zealand 60 years ago.

  7. | Posted: Dec 22 2013 - 1:02am

    The gas emissions from Kilauea volcano have been variable within a fairly steady range for the past few years; however, the numbers we use to characterize and report the emission rates will increase dramatically in 2014. This change in numbers is the result of using more accurate techniques to measure those emission rates and is not a change in the emission rates themselves.

  8. | Posted: Dec 22 2013 - 1:02am

    The gas emissions from Kilauea volcano have been variable within a fairly steady range for the past few years; however, the numbers we use to characterize and report the emission rates will increase dramatically in 2014. This change in numbers is the result of using more accurate techniques to measure those emission rates and is not a change in the emission rates themselves.

  9. | Posted: Dec 8 2013 - 12:05am

    Last week we showed that Kilauea has explosive eruptions that can carry volcanic ash, less than 0.08 inch across, and small lapilli, 0.08 to 2.5 inches across, high into the sky. Today we track the flight of two small lapilli, one confined to the trade winds and one rising higher.

  10. | Posted: Dec 8 2013 - 12:05am

    Last week we showed that Kilauea has explosive eruptions that can carry volcanic ash, less than 0.08 inch across, and small lapilli, 0.08 to 2.5 inches across, high into the sky. Today we track the flight of two small lapilli, one confined to the trade winds and one rising higher.

  11. | Posted: Dec 1 2013 - 12:05am

    In past Volcano Watches, we’ve emphasized a radically new way to view Kilauea — as an explosive volcano. Though not explosive now, it was dominantly explosive during 60 percent, or 1,500 years, of the past 2,500 years. Its latest major period of explosiveness lasted 300 years between the dawn of the New World and the Napoleonic era, which ended in 1815.

  12. | Posted: Dec 1 2013 - 12:05am

    In past Volcano Watches, we’ve emphasized a radically new way to view Kilauea — as an explosive volcano. Though not explosive now, it was dominantly explosive during 60 percent, or 1,500 years, of the past 2,500 years. Its latest major period of explosiveness lasted 300 years between the dawn of the New World and the Napoleonic era, which ended in 1815.

  13. | Posted: Nov 24 2013 - 12:05am

    At the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, we focus on keeping up with the flow of data coming into our systems and servers from HVO’s monitoring networks and instruments. But we also take time each November to recognize the anniversaries of two significant Hawaiian earthquakes that are both important to remember, even as we pore over new data.

  14. | Posted: Nov 24 2013 - 12:05am

    At the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, we focus on keeping up with the flow of data coming into our systems and servers from HVO’s monitoring networks and instruments. But we also take time each November to recognize the anniversaries of two significant Hawaiian earthquakes that are both important to remember, even as we pore over new data.

  15. | Posted: Nov 17 2013 - 12:05am
    We are currently sandwiched between the Halloween and Thanksgiving holidays as the inexorable march of time brings the winter festivals ever closer. For Hawaii, this period also signals the time of year when interruptions in the trade winds become more common.