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Rocket science: Ukraine firm may have helped N. Korean missiles

| | Aug 19 2017 - 12:06am | Comments

Ukraine is virtually an “anything goes” zone for American entrepreneurs — as well as for people like the North Koreans. That idea has been reinforced by news reports that a Ukrainian factory sold North Korea rocket engines for intercontinental ballistic missiles, which Pyongyang wants to arm with nuclear warheads so it can threaten the United States as well as peace in its region.

  1. | Posted: Nov 30 2013 - 12:05am

    The fact sheet distributed by the Obama administration about the nuclear agreement with Iran is notable for its omissions. The 2,000-word document, like President Barack Obama’s televised statement Saturday night about the deal, stresses Iran’s pledge to cap its enrichment of uranium, delay the completion of a plutonium-producing reactor and accept additional inspections — measures that will guard against an attempt to produce a bomb while negotiations continue.

  2. | Posted: Nov 29 2013 - 12:05am

    Senate Finance Committee Chairman Max Baucus offered some good ideas last week for improving how the U.S. taxes American multinational corporations. The current system could certainly stand some improvement. It’s so bad, Congress might actually do something.

  3. | Posted: Nov 29 2013 - 12:05am

    Senate Finance Committee Chairman Max Baucus offered some good ideas last week for improving how the U.S. taxes American multinational corporations. The current system could certainly stand some improvement. It’s so bad, Congress might actually do something.

  4. | Posted: Nov 28 2013 - 12:06am

    Afghan President Hamid Karzai and the Obama administration are playing a dangerous game of brinkmanship, one that could lead to a strategic reverse for the United States and a catastrophe for Afghanistan.

  5. | Posted: Nov 28 2013 - 12:06am

    Afghan President Hamid Karzai and the Obama administration are playing a dangerous game of brinkmanship, one that could lead to a strategic reverse for the United States and a catastrophe for Afghanistan.

  6. | Posted: Nov 27 2013 - 12:06am

    The federal Communications Commission may permit airlines to experiment with allowing passengers to use cellphones in flight, officials said last week. The agency should do so, and airlines should get on with experimenting. Permission is not requirement; a change in federal rules would not necessarily mean the ruination of air travel for all time.

  7. | Posted: Nov 27 2013 - 12:06am

    The federal Communications Commission may permit airlines to experiment with allowing passengers to use cellphones in flight, officials said last week. The agency should do so, and airlines should get on with experimenting. Permission is not requirement; a change in federal rules would not necessarily mean the ruination of air travel for all time.

  8. | Posted: Nov 26 2013 - 12:06am

    The agreement with Iran announced early Sunday in Geneva will cap the expansion of its nuclear infrastructure and lengthen the time Tehran would need for a “breakout” attempt to build a bomb. Though the accord is freighted with risk, it is worthy as an interim step — and preferable to the military action that might otherwise have been deemed necessary.

  9. | Posted: Nov 26 2013 - 12:06am

    The agreement with Iran announced early Sunday in Geneva will cap the expansion of its nuclear infrastructure and lengthen the time Tehran would need for a “breakout” attempt to build a bomb. Though the accord is freighted with risk, it is worthy as an interim step — and preferable to the military action that might otherwise have been deemed necessary.

  10. | Posted: Nov 25 2013 - 12:06am

    Like a slow-motion car crash, the unraveling of Venezuela’s economy and political system is a fascinating, as well as sickening, spectacle. Last month we noted the attempt of Nicolas Maduro, the would-be caudillo who succeeded Hugo Chavez as president, to distract public attention from world-beating inflation, shortages, power outages and crime by expelling several U.S. diplomats who he claimed were engaged in nefarious sabotage. Now, with prices still rising as fast as his popularity is dropping, Mr. Maduro has adopted a drastic tactic: state-sponsored looting.

  11. | Posted: Nov 25 2013 - 12:06am

    Like a slow-motion car crash, the unraveling of Venezuela’s economy and political system is a fascinating, as well as sickening, spectacle. Last month we noted the attempt of Nicolas Maduro, the would-be caudillo who succeeded Hugo Chavez as president, to distract public attention from world-beating inflation, shortages, power outages and crime by expelling several U.S. diplomats who he claimed were engaged in nefarious sabotage. Now, with prices still rising as fast as his popularity is dropping, Mr. Maduro has adopted a drastic tactic: state-sponsored looting.

  12. | Posted: Nov 24 2013 - 12:05am

    Twenty-five years ago, it took the specter of a deranged dictator sending agents to the United States with plastic guns to get Congress to pass a law banning undetectable weapons. Now that law is about to expire, and though the dictator is dead, the threat is more real than ever.

  13. | Posted: Nov 24 2013 - 12:05am

    Twenty-five years ago, it took the specter of a deranged dictator sending agents to the United States with plastic guns to get Congress to pass a law banning undetectable weapons. Now that law is about to expire, and though the dictator is dead, the threat is more real than ever.

  14. | Posted: Nov 23 2013 - 12:05am

    The rewriting of filibuster rules by Senate Democrats on Thursday changed the legislative body in fundamental ways, and for the worse. Republicans whose unjustified recalcitrance provoked the change should be ashamed. Democrats who are celebrating will soon enough regret their decision. The radical action, a product of poisonous partisanship, will also be an accelerant of poisonous partisanship.

  15. | Posted: Nov 23 2013 - 12:05am

    The rewriting of filibuster rules by Senate Democrats on Thursday changed the legislative body in fundamental ways, and for the worse. Republicans whose unjustified recalcitrance provoked the change should be ashamed. Democrats who are celebrating will soon enough regret their decision. The radical action, a product of poisonous partisanship, will also be an accelerant of poisonous partisanship.