Happy tails: Kua O Ka La PCS preschoolers get encounter of lifetime with dolphins

  • Kua O Ka La Public Charter School preschool students Nayeli Tragash, left, Malia Wentworth and Uriah Bauers experience a dolphin encounter with Lehua at Dolphin Quest at the Hilton Waikoloa Village Monday morning. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)
  • Students, parents and teachers from Kua O Ka La Public Charter School descend the Hilton Waikoloa Village grand staircase on their way to Dolphin Quest Monday morning. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)
  • Preschool students from Kua O Ka La Public Charter School watch a puppet show presented by Dolphin Quest Monday at the Hilton Waikoloa Village. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)
  • Preschool students from Kua O Ka La Public Charter School watch a puppet show presented by Dolphin Quest Monday at the Hilton Waikoloa Village. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)
  • Preschool student Lali Ekstrom from Kua O Ka La Public Charter School watches a puppet show presented by Dolphin Quest Monday at the Hilton Waikoloa Village. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)
  • Preschool teacher Deanna Wentworth and her students from Kua O Ka La Public Charter School watch a puppet show presented by Dolphin Quest Monday at the Hilton Waikoloa Village. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)
  • Kua O Ka La Public Charter School preschool students Keahi and Kahuwai Gonsalves watch a puppet show put on by Dolphin Quest at the Hilton Waikoloa Village Monday morning. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)
  • Kua O Ka La Public Charter School preschool students put on life jackets before getting into the water at Dolphin Quest at the Hilton Waikoloa Village Monday morning. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)
  • Kua O Ka La Public Charter School preschool students Nayeli Tragash, Uriah Bauers and Malia Wentworth join Kumu Kaimana Dilcher in a dolphin encounter with Lehua at Dolphin Quest at the Hilton Waikoloa Village Monday morning. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)
  • Kua O Ka La Public Charter School preschool students Nayeli Tragash, left and Uriah Bauers experience a dolphin encounter with Lehua at Dolphin Quest at the Hilton Waikoloa Village Monday morning. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)
  • Kua O Ka La Public Charter School preschool students experience a dolphin encounter with Lehua at Dolphin Quest at the Hilton Waikoloa Village Monday morning. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)
  • Kua O Ka La Public Charter School preschool students Uriah Bauers, left, Malia Wentworth and Kaimana Eames experience a dolphin encounter with Lehua at Dolphin Quest at the Hilton Waikoloa Village Monday morning. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)
  • Kua O Ka La Public Charter School preschool students Malia Wentworth, left, Kumu Kaimana Dilcher, Kaimana Eames, Nayeli Tragash, Uriah Bauers and Mika Hoomanawanui-Fierra experience a dolphin encounter with Lehua at Dolphin Quest at the Hilton Waikoloa Village Monday morning. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)
  • Keiki are thrilled at the dolphins' jumps at Dolphin Quest Monday at the Hilton Waikoloa Village. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)
  • Keiki are thrilled at the dolphins' jumps at Dolphin Quest Monday at the Hilton Waikoloa Village. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)
  • Keiki from Kua O Ka La Public Charter School arrive by bus from Puna for their Dolphin Quest experience Monday at the Hilton Waikoloa Village. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)
  • Preschool students from Kua O Ka La Public Charter School make "dolphin fins" before entering the water at Dolphin Quest Monday at the Hilton Waikoloa Village. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)
  • Preschool students from Kua O Ka La Public Charter School learn how to gently pet a dolphin before entering the water at Dolphin Quest Monday at the Hilton Waikoloa Village. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)
  • Preschool students and teachers from Kua O Ka La Public Charter School take a group photo before entering the water at Dolphin Quest Monday at the Hilton Waikoloa Village. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)

WAIKOLOA — As the dolphins’ tails hit the water, the keiki started to jump, splashing along with the playful creatures.

With smiles from ear to ear and exclamations of glee and awe, the 18 preschoolers from Kua O Ka La Public Charter School in Puna got up close and personal with the coastal bottlenose dolphins at Dolphin Quest at Hilton Waikoloa Village.

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“It was good touching and feeding the dolphins,” 5-year-old Kaimana Eams shared enthusiastically just after getting out of the Dolphin Quest lagoon. “I like how it feeled because it was really smooth.”

The time in the water Monday with the marine mammals was the culmination of a very special field trip for these youngsters who have been out of the classroom since last week when activity at Kilauea Volcano’s lower East Rift Zone forced the charter school’s main campus in Pahoa to relocate to Hilo and the preschool in Nanawale Estates to close.

Though planned ahead in February, the field trip couldn’t have come at a better time.

“It’s just an infusion of joy in this very difficult moment,” said Susie Osborne, founder of Kua O Ka La Public Charter School.

Of the 232 pupils that attend Kua O Ka La, 80 students’ families and about one-third of the staff from the pre-K through 12 school have been displaced or left homeless because of the volcanic activity, said Osborne.

Among those currently unable to go home are Daisy Miller and Natasha Torrance, whose families resided in Leilani Estates until evacuations were ordered. Miller and Torrance accompanied their children, Hezekaiah Jardine, 5, and Aidan Fernandez, 4, respectively, for Monday’s field trip.

“This is their final day of preschool — this is their celebration,” said Miller, who like most of the parents at Monday’s event wanted to focus on the day’s fun rather than the reality of life, right now, in Puna.

“It feels nice to have a normal day with our friends and ohana doing something fun, instead of stressing,” said Eams’ mother, Sarah Bradley, a Kalapana resident who has also evacuated to Hilo.

The day’s fun began from the moment the kids, parents and teachers stepped off the yellow school bus. After sharing a special chant, “Na Aumakua,” to bless the day, the youngsters took off on a trek through the grandiose hotel to the Dolphin Quest lagoon.

There, Dolphin Quest staff used stuffed animals to teach the kids all about Hawaii’s dolphins and sea creatures. After helping Daisy the dolphin find her way home to her family via the age-appropriate puppet show, the preschoolers got to the day’s main event, an encounter with the dolphins they’d just learned so much about.

“This is going to be a lifetime memory, seeing the dolphins,” said Melissa Ekstrom as her son Lalibela Ekstrom, 5, touched one of the dolphins. “This is great, and to be able to get him up-close is really special.”

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The field trip was part of Dolphin Quest’s ongoing educational programs that bring around 3,000 Hawaii Island students to the facility each year to learn about and interact with the marine mammals, said Cameron Dabney, regional outreach and stewardship coordinator for Dolphin Quest on Oahu and Hawaii Island.

Since opening in 1988, Dolphin Quest has hosted thousands of school children via its affordable educational programs to inspire the next generation of ocean stewards and preserve marine wildlife. For more information on Dolphin Quest’s educational programs, visit https://dolphinquest.com/hawaii-school-programs.

  1. Jim May 15, 2018 6:46 am

    I feel bad for the poor dolphins in captivity. They are right next to the big open ocean and kept in a small enclosure. Looks like they are teaching the next generation that dolphins exist for their amusement. It is unethical.


    1. JBruck May 15, 2018 10:46 am

      Yeah. But these dolphins were born under human care. The wild would be too much for them. They wouldn’t know how to catch their own fish and would probably get involved in dangerous interactions with humans in the wild. This way both people and dolphins can get amusement from each other.


  2. antifaHI May 15, 2018 7:47 pm

    These dolphins are stressed and alien to the Pacific. If they could they would rather kill themselves. We humans project self-serving images of Flipper, extraterrestrial beings, or some kind of healing spirituality into them. Yet their sole purpose is for making money for the owners.


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