Book Clubs: 07-05-19

Kona Stories community bookstore offers many choices of book clubs. Groups meet monthly to discuss books of fiction, travel, memoir, classics or non-fiction. Book groups are free if books are purchased from Kona Stories or a $5 donation is appreciated.

Bring a pupu or beverage to share and come prepared to discuss the following books. You can choose to attend any or all of these groups. They meet at 6 p.m. Kona Stories is located in the Keauhou Shopping Center in the courtyard shops on the KTA side.

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Info: 324-0350 or www.konastories.com.

Book clubs meeting this month are in fiction, classic and non-fiction, respectively.

6 p.m. July 9, “Clock Dance by Anne Tyler”

A charming novel of self-discovery and second chances from the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of A Spool of Blue Thread.

Willa Drake has had three opportunities to start her life over: in 1967, as a schoolgirl whose mother has suddenly disappeared; in 1977, when considering a marriage proposal; and in 1997, as a young widow trying to hold her family together.

So she is surprised when in 2017 she is given one last chance to change everything, after receiving a startling phone call from a stranger. Without fully understanding why, she flies across the country to Baltimore to help a young woman she’s never met. This impulsive decision, maybe the first one she’s consciously made in her life, will lead Willa into uncharted territory – surrounded by eccentric neighbors who treat each other like family, she finds solace and fulfillment in unexpected places. A bewitching novel of hope and transformation.

July 16, “Their Eyes were Watching God” by Zora Neale Hurston

A PBS Great American Read Top 100 Pick and one of the most important and enduring books of the twentieth century, Their Eyes Were Watching God brings to life a Southern love story with the wit and pathos found only in the writing of Zora Neale Hurston. Out of print for almost thirty years—due largely to initial audiences’ rejection of its strong black female protagonist—Hurston’s classic has since its 1978 reissue become perhaps the most widely read and highly acclaimed novel in the canon of African-American literature.

July 23, “The Woman’s Hour: the Great Fight to Win the Vote” by Elaine Weiss

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Nashville, August 1920. Thirty-five states have approved the Nineteenth Amendment, granting women the right to vote; one last state – Tennessee – is needed for the women’s voting rights to be the law of the land.

The suffragists face vicious opposition form politicians, clergy, corporations, and the racists who don’t want black women voting. And then there are the “Antis” – women who oppose their own enfranchisement, fearing suffrage will bring about the nation’s moral collapse. During this one hot summer, they all converge for a confrontation, replete with booze and blackmail, betrayal and courage. Following a handful of remarkable women who led their respective forces into battle, The Woman’s Hour is the gripping story of how America’s women won their own freedom, and the opening campaign in the great twentieth-century battles for civil rights.

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