Islanders who suffered 1940s war atrocities on Guam get paid

  • FILE - This Nov. 1, 1944 file photo shows the first religious service on Guam after U.S. landings are attended by soldiers, Nov. 1, 1944. An indigenous Chamorro serves as altar boy in this improvised hut. The 1941 Japanese invasion of Guam, which happened on the same December day as the attack on Hawaii's Pearl Harbor, set off years of forced labor, internment, torture, rape and beheadings. More than 75 years later, thousands of people on Guam, a U.S. territory, are expecting to get long-awaited compensation for their suffering at the hands of imperial Japan during World War II. (AP Photo/Joe Rosenthal, File)

  • In this Friday, Feb. 7, 2020 photo, Jesus San Nicolas, 86, sits at the Guam war claims office in Tamuning, Guam. The 1941 Japanese invasion of Guam, which happened on the same December day as the attack on Hawaii's Pearl Harbor, set off years of forced labor, internment, torture, rape and beheadings. Now, more than 75 years later, thousands of people on Guam, a U.S. territory, are expecting to get long-awaited compensation for their suffering at the hands of imperial Japan during World War II. (AP Photo/Anita Hofschneider)

  • In this Friday, Feb. 7, 2020 photo, people wait in line at the Guam war claims office in Tamuning, Guam. The 1941 Japanese invasion of Guam, which happened on the same December day as the attack on Hawaii's Pearl Harbor, set off years of forced labor, internment, torture, rape and beheadings. Now, more than 75 years later, thousands of people on Guam, a U.S. territory, are expecting to get long-awaited compensation for their suffering at the hands of imperial Japan during World War II. (AP Photo/Anita Hofschneider)

  • In this Friday, Feb. 7, 2020 photo, Antonina Palomo Cross, 85, sits at the Guam war claims office in Tamuning, Guam after getting confirmation that she will receive a payment for her experience living through the Japanese occupation of the U.S. Pacific island territory in 1941. The 1941 Japanese invasion of Guam, which happened on the same December day as the attack on Hawaii's Pearl Harbor, set off years of forced labor, internment, torture, rape and beheadings. Now, more than 75 years later, thousands of people on Guam, a U.S. territory, are expecting to get long-awaited compensation for their suffering at the hands of imperial Japan during World War II. (AP Photo/Anita Hofschneider)

  • FILE - In this August, 1944 file photo, people of Guam pour out of the hills into the Agana refugee camp. The 1941 Japanese invasion of Guam, which happened on the same December day as the attack on Hawaii's Pearl Harbor, set off years of forced labor, internment, torture, rape and beheadings. More than 75 years later, thousands of people on Guam, a U.S. territory, are expecting to get long-awaited compensation for their suffering at the hands of imperial Japan during World War II. (AP Photo/Joe Rosenthal, File)

  • FILE - In this Aug. 9, 1944 file photo, U.S. soldiers walk by a bombed out cemetery in Agana, Guam. The 1941 Japanese invasion of Guam, which happened on the same December day as the attack on Hawaii's Pearl Harbor, set off years of forced labor, internment, torture, rape and beheadings. Now, more than 75 years later, thousands of people on Guam, a U.S. territory, are expecting to get long-awaited compensation for their suffering at the hands of imperial Japan during World War II. (AP Photo/Joe Rosenthal, File)

HAGATÑA — For Antonina Palomo Cross, Japan’s occupation of Guam started with terror at church. The then-7-year-old was attending Catholic services with her family when the 1941 invasion began, setting off bomb blasts, sirens and screams.