Ethnobotanical garden a go to grow

  • The South Kona Kupuna Ukulele Band performs Saturday at the Grow Hawaiian Festival and grand re-opening of the Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden.

  • Avalon Paradea, right, teaches Joey Melendez, 4, how to pound kapa Saturday at the Grow Hawaiian Festival and grand re-opening of the Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)

  • Krista Johnson, left, teaches Sandi Kauahikaua how to weave a net Saturday at the Grow Hawaiian Festival and grand re-opening of the Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)

  • Different varieties of ko, or sugar cane are displayed Saturday at the Grow Hawaiian Festival and grand re-opening of the Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)

  • Noa Lincoln explains the different varieties of ko or sugar cane Saturday at the Grow Hawaiian Festival and grand re-opening of the Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden.

  • Coconut husk weaving is displayed Saturday.

  • Kahaka‘io Ravenscraft displays wood carving tools to visitors Saturday at the Grow Hawaiian Festival and grand re-opening of the Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)

  • Ulalia Kaai Berman ties a ti leaf lei around Keanuenue Roldan Saturday at the Grow Hawaiian Festival and grand re-opening of the Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)

  • Hand carved stamps are displayed Saturday at the Grow Hawaiian Festival and grand re-opening of the Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)

  • Kalo grows in the garden Saturday at the Grow Hawaiian Festival and grand re-opening of the Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)

  • Kaohu Monford talks about native medicinal plants while Danny Akaka watches Saturday at the Grow Hawaiian Festival and grand re-opening of the Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden. See more photos on page 8A. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)

  • Kalima Smith displays his ipu Saturday at the Grow Hawaiian Festival and grand re-opening of the Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)

  • Savia Kailihiwa learns how to pound poi Saturday at the Grow Hawaiian Festival.

  • Weaving is demonstrated Saturday at the Grow Hawaiian Festival and grand re-opening of the Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)

  • Weaving is demonstrated Saturday at the Grow Hawaiian Festival.

  • Visitors take photos of an ulu tree Saturday at the Grow Hawaiian Festival and grand re-opening of the Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)

The Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden in Captain Cook celebrated its grand re-opening Saturday with the Grow Hawaiian Festival.

The garden, which has been closed since 2015, was teeming with visitors learning about the Hawaiian culture through artisans and craftsmen demonstrating their skills, garden tours and presentations.

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