Adapting aloha: Virus forces changes to Hawaii customs

  • In this Tuesday, March 31, 2020 photo, comedian Frank De Lima poses with a "shaka" gesture while standing in the checkout line at a Sam's Club store in Honolulu. People in Hawaii are changing how they express aloha in the time of coronavirus. Some residents say social distancing is the antithesis of tradition in the state, where people greet each other with hugs, kisses and lei, and families are close-knit. (AP Photo/Jennifer Sinco Kelleher)

  • In this Wednesday, April 1, 2020 photo Glen Kila, left, and Brad Suzuki, right, flash the Hawaii "shaka" signs with their hands and give slight bows, demonstrating how they greet people using social distancing to curb the spread of coronavirus in Waianae, Hawaii. People in Hawaii are changing how they express aloha in the time of coronavirus. Residents say social distancing is necessary, even though it's the antithesis of tradition in the state, where people greet each other with hugs, kisses and lei, and families are close-knit. (AP Photo/Jennifer Sinco Kelleher).

  • FILE - In this April 20, 2015, file photo Mike McCartney, center, Gov. David Ige's former chief of staff, greets Mauna Kea telescope opponent Kealoha Pisciotta using honi, a traditional Hawaiian forehead-to-forehead greeting at the Hawaii Capitol in Honolulu. People in Hawaii are changing how they express aloha in the time of coronavirus. Some residents say social distancing is the antithesis of tradition in the state, where people greet each other with hugs, kisses and lei, and families are close-knit. (AP Photo/Jennifer Sinco Kelleher, File)

WAIANAE, Oahu — Glen Kila has long greeted people in the traditional Native Hawaiian way.