Guam worries as sailors from virus-hit ship take over hotels

In this April 7, 2020, photo, released by the U.S. Navy, sailors assigned to the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt, who have tested negative for COVID-19 and are asymptomatic, are checked at local hotels in Guam in an effort to implement social distancing. People in Guam are used to a constant U.S. military presence on the strategic Pacific island, but some are nervous as hundreds of sailors from the coronavirus-stricken Navy aircraft carrier flood into hotels for quarantine. Officials insist they have enforced strict safety measures. (Mass Communication Specialist Julio Rivera/U.S. Navy via AP)

A man, who identified himself as a crew member of the U.S.S. Theodore Roosevelt, exercises out on the balcony of a room at the Hilton Guam Resort & Spa, in Tumon, Guam on Thursday, April 9, 2020. The hotel, as well as several others that normally cater to the island's tourism industry, are currently being used to isolate some of the thousands of military personnel who serve aboard the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier and are undergoing testing for the coronavirus. (Rick Cruz/The Pacific Daily via AP)

A Guam Customs and Quarantine Agency vehicle pulls up to a security checkpoint positioned on the road leading to the Hilton Guam Resort & Spa in Tumon, Guam on Thursday, April 9, 2020. The hotel, as well as several others that normally cater to the island's tourism industry, are currently being used to isolate some of the thousands of military personnel who serve aboard the USS Theodore Roosevelt. The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier docked in Guam, on March 27, after service members on the vessel were diagnosed with the coronavirus. (Rick Cruz/The Pacific Daily via AP)

In this April 7, 2020, photo released by the U.S. Navy, sailors assigned to the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt move ready to eat meals for sailors who have tested negative for COVID-19 and are being taken to local hotels in an effort to implement social distancing at Naval Base Guam. People in Guam are used to a constant U.S. military presence on the strategic Pacific island, but some are nervous as hundreds of sailors from the coronavirus-stricken Navy aircraft carrier flood into hotels for quarantine. Officials insist they have enforced strict safety measures. (Mass Communication Specialist Julio Rivera/U.S. Navy via AP)

HONOLULU — People in Guam are used to a constant U.S. military presence on the strategic Pacific island, but some are nervous as hundreds of sailors from a coronavirus-stricken Navy aircraft carrier flood into hotels for quarantine. Officials insist they have enforced strict safety measures.