3D printing’s new challenge: Solving the US housing shortage

  • This photo provided by Mighty Buildings shows a 3D-printed housing module being delivered in Livermore, Calif. Most of the modules built by Mighty Buildings are assembled in the factory, transported by truck to the owner’s property, then put into place using a crane. (Courtesy of Mighty Buildings via AP)

  • This photo provided by ICON shows one of its 3D-printed homes in Austin, Texas. It’s part of a new generation of startups that wants to disrupt the way houses are built by automating production with industrial 3D printers. (Regan Morton Photography/Courtesy of ICON via AP)

  • Mighty Buildings production manager Yonah Naftaly stands in front of 3D printed homes being prepared for delivery to its customers, Wednesday, March 17, 2021, in Oakland, Calif. The printer can produce the entire exterior shell of a studio home or individual wall panels that can easily assembled with simple tools, the company said. Mighty Buildings is now producing 350-square-foot backyard studios, known in the industry as “accessory dwelling units,” that can be used as extra bedrooms, playrooms, gyms or home offices. (AP Photo/Terry Chea)

  • Mighty Buildings production manager Yonah Naftaly shows a machine that fills 3D printed wall panels with insulating foam, Wednesday, March 17, 2021, in Oakland, Calif. The printer can produce the entire exterior shell of a studio home or individual wall panels that can easily assembled with simple tools, the company said. Mighty Buildings is now producing 350-square-foot backyard studios, known in the industry as “accessory dwelling units,” that can be used as extra bedrooms, playrooms, gyms or home offices. (AP Photo/Terry Chea)

A new generation of startups wants to disrupt the way houses are built by automating production with industrial 3D printers.