Island Life: I egret nothing

  • A cattle egret perches on top of a Norfolk Island Pine in Hualalai Colony in Kona. The Hawaii Board of Agriculture and Forestry introduced cattle egrets to Hawaii in 1959 to help cattle ranchers manage flies. Today, cattle egrets are considered invasive because they eat eggs from nests of native birds. (Elizabeth Weintraub/Community contributor)

A cattle egret perches on top of a Norfolk Island Pine in Hualalai Colony in Kona. The Hawaii Board of Agriculture and Forestry introduced cattle egrets to Hawaii in 1959 to help cattle ranchers manage flies. Today, cattle egrets are considered invasive because they eat eggs from nests of native birds. (Elizabeth Weintraub/Community contributor)

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