Turning outrage into power: How far right is changing GOP

  • FILE - From left, Rep. Lauren Boebert, R-Colo., Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., and Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, R-Ga., attend the House Judiciary Committee oversight hearing of the United States Department of Justice with testimony from Attorney General Merrick Garland, Oct. 21, 2021 on Capitol Hill in Washington. after Donald Trump's presidency the ability to enrage has become a potent metric for Republicans looking to reclaim a House majority next year by firing up Trump supporters.  That’s helped elevate a group of far-right lawmakers — including Boebert, Greene and Rep. Paul Gosar of Arizona — whose inflammatory comments would likely have made them pariahs in the past. (Michaels Reynolds/Pool via AP, File)

  • FILE - House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., responds to reporters at the Capitol in Washington, Dec. 3, 2021, about the behavior of Rep. Lauren Boebert, R-Colo. McCarthy appears to have settled on a strategy to deal with a handful of Republican lawmakers who have stirred outrage with violent, racist and sometimes Islamophobic comments. If you can't police them, promote them. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

WASHINGTON — House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy appears to have settled on a strategy to deal with a handful of Republican lawmakers who have stirred outrage with violent, racist and sometimes Islamophobic comments.