Rastafari want more legal marijuana for freedom of worship

  • Ras Nyah, left, a Rastafari adherent from the U.S. Virgin Islands, watches musician Milton Blake perform a song about legalizing marijuana, which Rastafari followers believe brings them closer to the divine, on Tuesday, Nov. 2, 2021, in Columbus, Ohio. (AP Photo/Luis Andres Henao)

  • Paul Gentles, a Jamaican artist and member of the Rastafari faith, uses cornmeal to decorate an offering of fruits and flowers during a drumming circle at Brooklyn’s Prospect Park on Sunday, Oct. 24, 2021. As public opinion and policy continues to shift across the world toward the medicinal and recreational use of cannabis, some Rastafari adherents are questioning their place in the legal market of the herb that they consider sacred. (AP Photo/Luis Andres Henao)

  • Amaha Sellassie prays as Ras'Micael Inman, 12, Miziah Smith, 9, and Taleia Inman, 10, read the Bible during an event by the Rastafari Coalition marking the 91st anniversary of the coronation of the late Ethiopian Emperor Haile Selassie I in Columbus, Ohio on Tuesday, Nov. 2, 2021. The coronation day event included chanting, traditional nyabinghi drumming and the reading of psalms, which are the core of Rastafari holiday celebrations. (AP Photo/Emily Leshner)

  • Empress Imani Tafari, 8, and Ras Mo dance during an event by the Rastafari Coalition marking the 91st anniversary of the coronation of the late Ethiopian Emperor Haile Selassie I in Columbus, Ohio on Tuesday, Nov. 2, 2021. The coronation day event included chanting, traditional nyabinghi drumming and the reading of psalms, which are the core of Rastafari holiday celebrations. (AP Photo/Emily Leshner)

  • Mark Hunter, lead singer of the Ark Band, performs at an event organized by the nonprofit Rastafari Coalition marking the 91st anniversary of the coronation of the late Ethiopian Emperor Haile Selassie I on Tuesday, Nov. 2, 2021, in Columbus, Ohio. The coronation day event also included chanting, traditional nyabinghi drumming and the reading of psalms, which are the core of Rastafari holiday celebrations. (AP Photo/Luis Andres Henao)

  • From left, Mosiyah Tafari and Binghi Neal take a break from traditional nyabinghi drumming and chanting on stage as frankincense wafts from a burner held by Ras Jahbo, center, during an event by the Rastafari Coalition marking the 91st anniversary of the coronation of the late Ethiopian Emperor Haile Selassie I in Columbus, Ohio on Tuesday, Nov. 2, 2021. As public opinion and policy continues to shift in the U.S. and across the world towards the use of marijuana, some adherents of Rastafari question their place in the future of the herb that they consider sacred. (AP Photo/Luis Andres Henao)

  • Lael Tafari, right, a respected elder in Ohio’s Rastafari community, greets Rastafari adherent Ras Zack Scott, left, on the sidelines of an event organized by the Columbus, Ohio-based Rastafari Coalition marking the 91st anniversary of the coronation of the late Ethiopian Emperor Haile Selassie I on Tuesday, Nov. 2, 2021 in Columbus, Ohio. (AP Photo/Luis Andres Henao)

  • Jahdarah Mahan, a Rastafari from Cincinnati, Ohio poses for a portrait after an event organized by the Columbus, Ohio-based Rastafari Coalition marking the 91st anniversary of the coronation of the late Ethiopian Emperor Haile Selassie I on Tuesday, Nov. 2, 2021, in Columbus, Ohio. For Rastafari, the ritualistic smoking of marijuana brings them closer to the divine, and as public opinion and policy continues to shift across the world toward the use of cannabis, some are questioning their place in the future of the herb that they consider sacred. (AP Photo/Luis Andres Henao)

  • Zack Scott prays during an event by the Rastafari Coalition marking the 91st anniversary of the coronation of the late Ethiopian Emperor Haile Selassie I in Columbus, Ohio on Nov. 2. As public opinion and policy continues to shift in the U.S. and across the world toward the use of marijuana, some adherents of Rastafari question their place in the future of the herb that they consider sacred. (AP Photo/Emily Leshner)

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Mosiyah Tafari banged on drums and chanted psalms with other Rastafari in a ballroom where the smoke of frankincense mixed with the fragrant smell of marijuana — which his faith deems sacred.