NOT REAL NEWS: A look at what didn’t happen this week

  • A dose of a Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine is prepared at Lurie Children’s hospital, Nov. 5, 2021, in Chicago. On Friday, Associated Press reported on stories circulating online incorrectly claiming there is a “massive spike” in cancer rates, with certain types of cancers up 20 times the normal rate since the “Operation Warp Speed injections were first introduced.” (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh, File)

  • President Joe Biden speaks at an event to discuss gun violence strategies, at police headquarters, Thursday, in New York. On Friday, The Associated Press reported on stories circulating online incorrectly claiming gun manufacturers are “the only industry in America that is exempted from being sued by the public. The only one.”. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)

  • Police officers patrol on foot along Albert Street as a protest against COVID-19 restrictions continue in Ottawa on Thursday. On Friday, The Associated Press reported on stories circulating online incorrectly claiming half of the police officers in Canada’s capital city resigned on Monday in support of protests against vaccine requirements. (Justin Tang /The Canadian Press via AP, File)

A roundup of some of the most popular but completely untrue stories and visuals of the week. None of these are legit, even though they were shared widely on social media. The Associated Press checked them out. Here are the facts: