NOT REAL NEWS: A look at what didn’t happen this week

  • Far-right leader Marine Le Pen gestures after speaking after the early result projections of the French presidential election runoff were announced in Paris, Sunday. On Friday, The Associated Press reported on stories circulating online incorrectly claiming the number of votes for French far-right presidential candidate Marine Le Pen decreased from 14.4 million during a live count to 13.3 million when her defeat was declared. (AP Photo/Michel Euler, File)

  • The Twitter application is seen on a digital device on Monday in San Diego. On Friday The Associated Press reported on stories circulating online incorrectly claiming shortly after Elon Musk reached an agreement to buy Twitter on Monday, April 25, Bill Gates was suspended from the platform.(AP Photo/Gregory Bull, File)

  • A member of the Philadelphia Fire Department prepares a dose of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination site setup in Philadelphia, on March 26, 2021. On Friday, The Associated Press reported on stories circulating online incorrectly claiming a recent outbreak of unexplained hepatitis cases among children is being caused by the adenovirus vector used in some COVID-19 vaccines, including the Johnson & Johnson shot.(AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

A roundup of some of the most popular but completely untrue stories and visuals of the week. None of these are legit, even though they were shared widely on social media. The Associated Press checked them out. Here are the facts: