NOT REAL NEWS: A look at what didn’t happen this week

  • This 2003 electron microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows a monkeypox virion, obtained from a sample associated with the 2003 prairie dog outbreak. Monkeypox, a disease that rarely appears outside Africa, has been identified by European and American health authorities in recent days. On Friday, The Associated Press reported on stories circulating online incorrectly claiming the recent cases of monkeypox are actually just shingles, and the cases are a result of the COVID-19 vaccine. (Cynthia S. Goldsmith, Russell Regner/CDC via AP, File)

  • A health care worker prepares a dose of the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine during a door-to-door vaccination campaign, in El Alto, Bolivia, on Sept. 17, 2021. On Friday, The Associated Press reported on stories circulating online incorrectly claiming the chimpanzee adenovirus vector used in AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine is causing the monkeypox outbreak. (AP Photo/Juan Karita, File)

  • A man walks by Pfizer headquarters on Feb. 5, 2021 in New York. On Friday, The Associated Press reported on stories circulating online incorrectly claiming Pfizer received FDA approval for a new monkeypox shot the day after the U.S. purchased millions of dollars worth of vaccine for the disease. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

A roundup of some of the most popular but completely untrue stories and visuals of the week. None of these are legit, even though they were shared widely on social media. The Associated Press checked them out. Here are the facts: