Documents reveal sea burials for 13 USS Indianapolis sailors

  • Map locates the wreckage of the USS Indianapolis sunk in 1945.

  • This undated family photo provided by David Payne shows Seaman 2nd Class George David Payne in his Navy uniform. (David Payne/via AP)

  • FILE - USS Indianapolis survivor Albert Morris of Akron, Ohio walks past a monument honoring fallen shipmates following a service in Indianapolis on July 24, 2005. The U.S. Navy on Friday, May 27, 2022, said it has changed the status of 13 sailors who were lost when Japanese torpedoes sank the USS Indianapolis July 30, 1945. There were only 316 survivors among the ship's crew of 1,195 sailors. About 300 went down with the ship and about 900 men were set adrift. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings, File)

  • FILE - Provisioning of the USS Indianapolis goes forward in preparation for departure from San Pedro, Calif., on April 14, 1937. The U.S. Navy on Friday, May 26, 2022, said it has changed the status of 13 sailors who were lost when Japanese torpedoes sank the USS Indianapolis July 30, 1945. There were only 316 survivors among the ship's crew of 1,195 sailors. About 300 went down with the ship and about 900 men were set adrift. (AP Photo/DBJ, File)

  • In this July 10, 1945, photo provided by U.S. Navy, the USS Indianapolis (CA 35) is shown off the Mare Island Navy Yard, in Vallejo, Calif. The U.S. Navy on Friday said it has changed the status of 13 sailors who were lost when Japanese torpedoes sank the USS Indianapolis July 30, 1945. There were only 316 survivors among the ship’s crew of 1,195 sailors. About 300 went down with the ship and about 900 men were set adrift. (U.S. Navy/via AP)

HONOLULU — Navy Seaman 2nd Class George David Payne was just 17 years old when a Japanese submarine torpedoed his ship in the last weeks of World War II, sinking the vessel and killing him along with more than 800 other U.S. sailors.