NOT REAL NEWS: A look at what didn’t happen this week

  • A Pfizer logo is shown at their global supply Kalamazoo manufacturing plant in Portage, Mich., on Dec. 11, 2020. On Friday, the Associated Press reported on stories circulating online incorrectly claiming that a Pfizer document reveals that 82%-97% of pregnant women who received the company’s COVID-19 vaccine “lost their babies.” The flawed calculation misrepresents a narrow subset of data from a Pfizer database of adverse events recorded during the first two months of the vaccine rollout. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File)

  • A droplet falls from a syringe after a health care worker was injected with the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at Women & Infants Hospital in Providence, R.I., on Dec. 15, 2020. On Friday, the Associated Press reported on stories circulating online incorrectly claiming that 20,000 people have died from COVID-19 vaccines. The figure misrepresents data maintained by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration. To date, a total of nine deaths in the U.S. have been linked to the shots. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)

A roundup of some of the most popular but completely untrue stories and visuals of the week. None of these are legit, even though they were shared widely on social media. The Associated Press checked them out. Here are the facts: