Far out: NASA space telescope’s 1st cosmic view goes deep

  • FILE - In this April 13, 2017, photo provided by NASA, technicians lift the mirror of the James Webb Space Telescope using a crane at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. NASA is releasing the first images from the new telescope this week. (Laura Betz/NASA via AP, File)

  • NASA administrator Bill Nelson speaks during an event with President Joe Biden about the first images from the Webb Space Telescope, the highest-resolution images of the infrared universe ever captured, in the South Court Auditorium on the White House complex, Monday, July 11, 2022, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

  • President Joe Biden listens during a briefing from NASA officials about the first images from the Webb Space Telescope, the highest-resolution images of the infrared universe ever captured, in the South Court Auditorium on the White House complex, Monday, July 11, 2022, in Washington. On screen are NASA Associate Administrator for the Science Mission Directorate Thomas Zurbuchen, top, Deputy Director of the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) Nancy Levenson, and NASA James Webb Space Telescope Program Director Greg Robinson, bottom. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

  • President Joe Biden listens during a briefing from NASA officials about the first images from the Webb Space Telescope, the highest-resolution images of the infrared universe ever captured, in the South Court Auditorium on the White House complex, Monday, July 11, 2022, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

  • President Joe Biden speaks during a briefing from NASA officials about the first images from the Webb Space Telescope, the highest-resolution images of the infrared universe ever captured, in the South Court Auditorium on the White House complex, Monday, July 11, 2022, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

  • President Joe Biden speaks during a briefing from NASA officials about the first images from the Webb Space Telescope, the highest-resolution images of the infrared universe ever captured, in the South Court Auditorium on the White House complex, Monday, July 11, 2022, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

  • This image provided by NASA on Monday, July 11, 2022, shows galaxy cluster SMACS 0723, captured by the James Webb Space Telescope. The telescope is designed to peer back so far that scientists can get a glimpse of the dawn of the universe about 13.7 billion years ago and zoom in on closer cosmic objects, even our own solar system, with sharper focus. (NASA/ESA/CSA/STScI via AP)

  • This March 5, 2020, photo made available by NASA shows the main mirror assembly of the James Webb Space Telescope during testing at a Northrop Grumman facility in Redondo Beach, Calif. NASA is releasing the first images from the new telescope this week. (Chris Gunn/NASA via AP, File)

  • This image provided by NASA on Monday, July 11, 2022, shows galaxy cluster SMACS 0723, captured by the James Webb Space Telescope. The telescope is designed to peer back so far that scientists can get a glimpse of the dawn of the universe about 13.7 billion years ago and zoom in on closer cosmic objects, even our own solar system, with sharper focus. (NASA/ESA/CSA/STScI via AP)

  • President Joe Biden listens during a briefing from NASA officials about the first images from the Webb Space Telescope, the highest-resolution images of the infrared universe ever captured, in the South Court Auditorium on the White House complex, Monday, July 11, 2022, in Washington. On screen are NASA Associate Administrator for the Science Mission Directorate Thomas Zurbuchen, top, Deputy Director of the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) Nancy Levenson, and NASA James Webb Space Telescope Program Director Greg Robinson, bottom. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Our view of the universe just expanded: The first image from NASA’s new space telescope unveiled Monday is brimming with galaxies and offers the deepest look of the cosmos ever captured.