Create rock and water elements to cool garden enjoyment

Let’s admit it, the world is getting hotter and this affects our island gardens. Hawaiian landscapes certainly have enough lava rock but may be lacking in water elements like streams, ponds, lakes and ocean frontage. In many other parts of the world, rock and water elements are used in the landscape to create a natural feeling and add interest to the design. Balinese gardens usually include not only naturalistic forms, but often, sculptured elements as well. In Japan the stone water basins that stand outside the teahouses are an example of rock and water used on a small scale. In almost any garden, the gentle sound and sight of water running over cool stones is refreshing.

Ex-lawmaker in bribery case donates to campaigns

HONOLULU — The campaign committee of former Oahu Democratic state Rep. Ty Cullen, who pleaded guilty earlier this year after taking bribes, donated to two candidates for the state House of Representatives last month.

Dems change some tax provisions as they ready economic bill

WASHINGTON — Democrats pared part of their proposed minimum tax on huge corporations and made other changes in their giant economic bill, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said Friday, as they drove toward delivering a campaign-season victory to President Joe Biden on his domestic agenda.

China cuts off vital US contacts over Pelosi Taiwan visit

WASHINGTON — China cut off contacts with the United States on vital issues Friday — including military matters and crucial climate cooperation — as concerns rose that the Communist government’s hostile reaction to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s Taiwan visit could signal a lasting, more aggressive approach toward its U.S. rival and the self-ruled island.

Editorial: Bill Russell and Nichelle Nichols, American heroes

There’s a reason for the simultaneous mourning and celebration of the lives of a basketball player and an actress, both out of the public eye for years. Nichelle Nichols, 89, and Bill Russell, 88, were born during the Great Depression into a society that defined them as second-class citizens simply because they were Black.