Editorial: Response to opioids epidemic should be modeled on response to AIDS epidemic

What a grim sign of the times: According to the National Safety Council, Americans are now more likely to accidentally die from an opioid overdose than an automobile wreck. The council’s analysis of preventable injury and fatality statistics from 2017 concluded that Americans had a 1 in 96 chance of dying from an accidental opioid overdose over their lifetimes. The odds of dying from a motor vehicle accident were 1 in 103.

Trump is an almost inexpressibly sad specimen

Half or a quarter of the way through this interesting experiment with an incessantly splenetic presidency, much of the nation has become accustomed to daily mortifications. Or has lost its capacity for embarrassment, which is even worse.

Editorial: The shutdown isn’t just hurting workers. The entire US economy is faltering

The longer the shutdown continues — it’s entering its fifth week, with no end in sight — the tougher it is for the roughly 800,000 unpaid federal workers and an estimated half a million unpaid federal contractors to make ends meet. Yet those of us who are still collecting wages in the private sector are being hurt too, and to a much greater extent than the Trump administration had previously acknowledged.

Trump-Russia conspiracy unlikely to pan out

Before we get to the question of whether the president of the United States is a Russian asset, let’s consider another question: When was the last time a popular and contentious conspiracy theory turned out to be true? Not a little true, but, like, really true?

Media must do better in 2020 coverage

WASHINGTON — The belief that constitutional democracy is superior to other forms of government rests in part on its capacity to encourage open debate and thus social learning.

That stupidity of the wall

As The Wall dominated the week’s news, a pitiful juxtaposition of two realities — one the hard truth, the other a lie — emerged to clarify the destructiveness of the American president’s toxic narcissism.

New age of political ‘authenticity’ alarming

WASHINGTON — In the carnage of American civic culture, some of the damage is obvious: the dehumanization of political opponents, the devaluation of truth, the rise of conspiracy thinking. But other less evident shifts are no less troubling. One concerns the use of the word “authenticity.”