Police Week remembers the fallen, thanks those still serving

  • Members of the Hawaii County Police Department come together to honor fallen officers Tuesday for the Police Week Ceremony at the Kona Police Station. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)
  • Victoria Kaupua sings a stirring rendition of the National Anthem Tuesday for the Police Week Ceremony at the Kona Police Station. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)
  • Officer Reyes simulates an arrest Tuesday for the Police Week Ceremony at the Kona Police Station. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)
  • Charlie O'Kelly plays taps Tuesday for the Police Week Ceremony at the Kona Police Station. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)
  • Officer Mike Abran serves as master of ceremonies Tuesday for the Police Week Ceremony at the Kona Police Station. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)
  • Members of the community come together to honor fallen officers Tuesday for the Police Week Ceremony at the Kona Police Station. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)
  • Hawaii County Police perform a 21 gun salute Tuesday for the Police Week Ceremony at the Kona Police Station. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)
  • Kaloko Honokohau Chief Ranger Janette Chiron speaks Tuesday at the Police Week Ceremony at the Kona Police Station. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)
  • Hawaii County Police Chief Paul Ferreira speaks Tuesday at the Police Week Ceremony at the Kona Police Station. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)
  • Candles are lit in memory of fallen officers Tuesday for the Police Week Ceremony at the Kona Police Station. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)
  • Hawaii County Police Chief Paul Ferreira, right and Deputy Chief Kenneth Bugado light a candle in memory of fallen officers Tuesday for the Police Week Ceremony at the Kona Police Station. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today)

KAILUA-KONA — While walking through the visitor’s center at Kaloko-Honokohau National Historic Park, a Washington state man was drawn to one particular photo out on display.

The picture was of National Park Ranger Steve Renard Makuakane-Jarrell, who was killed in the line of duty in 1999. His photo had been placed out as the nation recognizes law enforcement for Police Week and remembers those who gave the ultimate sacrifice.

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The visitor, Dale Schlack, a chaplain for Lynnwood Police Department in Lynnwood, Washington, asked the park ranger on duty about any Police Week ceremonies that might be taking place locally.

Schlack’s inquiry brought him to Tuesday’s event at the Kealakehe Police Station where members of the Hawaii Police Department and community gathered to remember Makuakane-Jarrell and four police officers who died in the line of duty.

Schlack attended the ceremony with his wife. He thought the service was “awesome” and was pleased with how well attended it was.

“I’m just thankful we were able to be here,” he said.

Schlack said law enforcement has been a part of his life for 30 years.

“They’re special to me,” he said of the officers.

After the memorial, Chief Paul K. Ferriera said the Hawaii Police Department’s Police Week services always have an out-of-state visitor in attendance.

“Law enforcement isn’t just a career, it’s a lifestyle and it’s recognized nationwide,” Ferriera said.

Last year, the chief said, the department made it a point to recognize Makuakane-Jarrell.

Ferriera added Police Week isn’t just about remembering the fallen officers, but recognizing officers and the good their doing.

A national monument in Washington, D.C., has 21,183 names of fallen officers etched into the stone. During the service, the chief told the crowd that 55 of those names are from Hawaii.

In 2016, Hawaii County police unveiled its own police memorial, which is located in Hilo.

“The memorial does not only represent a memorial to our fallen officers,” the chief said. “It is a visual reminder to each and every officer coming on duty in the Hawaii Police Department to remain vigilant and stay safe.”

Ferriera added that it was his hope and desire that the department never put another name on the memorial.

Deputy Managing Director Barbara Kossow spoke on behalf of Mayor Harry Kim. She said it takes special qualities to be a police officer. The work is demanding, it doesn’t watch the clocks or take holidays.

Kossow added that the profession puts demands on families and on the individuals themselves.

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“But they do their job day in and day out,” she said. “We cannot thank our police officers and park rangers enough. They made the greatest sacrifice for the sake of others and there’s no way we can adequately honor the memory of these brave souls.”

Also recognized on Tuesday were William “Red” Oili, Manuel Cadinha, Ronald “Shige” Jitchaku and Kenneth Keliipio, who each gave the ultimate sacrifice.