Warp-speed spending and other surreal stats of COVID times

  • FILE - In this Dec. 13, 2020, file photo, boxes containing the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine are prepared to be shipped at the Pfizer Global Supply Kalamazoo manufacturing plant in Portage, Mich. Michigan announced Wednesday, March 3, 2021, that everyone ages 50 to 64 can start getting COVID-19 vaccinations on March 22 and that those in that group with certain medical conditions can begin being immunized next week. (AP Photo/Morry Gash, Pool, File)

  • FILE - In this Thursday, March 11, 2021, file photo, a health worker loads syringes with the vaccine on the first day of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine being made available to residents at the Baldwin Hills Crenshaw Plaza in Los Angeles. California officials say much of the state will be able to reopen next week to indoor activities as coronavirus case rates remain low. At the same time, more than 4 million residents with certain disabilities or health concerns become eligible for a vaccine. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File)

WASHINGTON — The U.S. effort in World War II was off the charts. Battles spread over three continents and four years, 16 million served in uniform and the government shoved levers of the economy full force into defeating Nazi Germany and imperial Japan.