‘Bringing nature in’: Japanese gardens speak to the moment

  • This photo provided by Portland Japanese Garden shows their Cultural Village and its entry garden. (James Florio/Portland Japanese Garden via AP)

  • This photo provided by Portland Japanese Garden shows the view approaching the Cultural Village from the Sheila Edwards-Lienhart Bridge. (Garry Belinsky/Portland Japanese Garden via AP)

  • This photo provided by Portland Japanese Garden shows their Tea House as viewed from the Tea Garden after Rain. (Tyler Quinn/Portland Japanese Garden via AP)

  • This image provided by Robert C. Muschewske/ Summit Images, LLC shows a home in St. Paul, Minnesota. The garden evokes a rocky lakeshore with a placid dry lake of gravel. The surrounding planting is manipulated to provide enclosure in a "distilled" style that celebrates the natural landscape of Minnesota, particularly the north shore of Lake Superior and the spectacular Boundary Waters. The garden in this image was designed and constructed by David Slawson. It was later restored and expanded by John Powell, of Zoen, LLC. (Robert C. Muschewske/ Summit Images, LLC via AP)

  • This photo provided by Portland Japanese Garden shows two pavement styles in their Natural garden. (Jack Jakobsen/Portland Japanese Garden via AP)

  • This image provided by Robert C. Muschewske/ Summit Images, LLC shows a garden around a single family home in St. Paul, Minnesota. The courtyard shows the entry courtyard, where the landscape suggests an alpine meadow with a meandering stream. The garden in this image was designed and constructed by David Slawson. It was later restored and expanded by John Powell, of Zoen, LLC. (Robert C. Muschewske/ Summit Images, LLC via AP)

Japanese-style gardens first caught the public imagination in the U.S. at an 1893 world exposition in Chicago, became a sought-after feature in Gilded Age estates, and were later adapted to open-plan modernist homes.