In freezing Afghanistan, aid workers rush to save millions

  • Afghans wait to receive food rations organized by the World Food Program (WFP) in Pul-e-Alam, the capital of Logar province. eastern of Afghanistan, Tuesday, Jan. 18, 2022. The Taliban's sweep to power in Afghanistan in August drove billions of dollars in international assistance out of the country and sent an already dirt-poor poor nation, ravaged by war, drought and floods, spiralling toward a humanitarian catastrophe. (AP Photo/Zubair Abassi)

  • Gulnaz, left, keep her 18-month-old son warm themselves as they wait for alms in the Kabul - Pul-e-Alam highway eastern Afghanistan on Tuesday. The Taliban’s sweep to power in Afghanistan in August drove billions of dollars in international assistance out of the country and sent an already dirt-poor poor nation, ravaged by war, drought and floods, spiralling toward a humanitarian catastrophe. (AP Photo/Kathy Gannon)

PUL-E-ALAM, Afghanistan— A flickering flame of paper, rags and random twigs is the only heat Gulnaz has to keep her 18-month-old son warm, barely visible beneath his icy blanket as she begs on a bitterly cold highway on the road to Kabul.