Fuel in water deepens Native Hawaiians’ distrust of military

  • U.S. Rep. Kaiali'i Kahele speaks at a rally at the Hawaii state capitol over water contamination by the U.S. Navy near Pearl Harbor on Feb. 11 in Honolulu. Native Hawaiians who revere water in all its forms as the embodiment of a Hawaiian god say the Navy's acknowledgement that jet fuel leaked into Pearl Harbor's tap water has deepened the distrust they feel toward the U.S. military. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones)

  • A group of demonstrators wave signs at the Hawaii state capitol during a rally over water contamination by the U.S. Navy near Pearl Harbor on Feb. 11, 2022 in Honolulu. Native Hawaiians who revere water in all its forms as the embodiment of a Hawaiian god say the Navy's acknowledgement that jet fuel leaked into Pearl Harbor's tap water has deepened the distrust they feel toward the U.S. military. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones)

  • In this photo provided by Bradford Nakamura, Makaio Villanueva, left, and Gina Peterson chant about the importance of water during a traditional Hawaiian ceremony on December 12, 2021, in Honolulu. Protesters who erected the shrine at the gates of the headquarters of the commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet oppose the U.S. Navy's use of a giant fuel storage tank facility because jet fuel leaked into a drinking water well. (Bradford Nakamura via AP)

HONOLULU — A well-known adage in Hawaiian, ola i ka wai, means “water is life.”