America’s love affair with the lawn is getting messy

  • This 2021 image provided by LeighAnn Ferrara shows Ferrara's small yard in White Plains, N.Y. The remaining grass lawn is now mostly a path between flower beds, vegetables and fruit trees. Pictured plants include hydrangea and viburnum. Many people are converting parts of their lawns into more diverse plantings. (LeighAnn Ferrara via AP)

  • A front yard in Westchester County, N.Y., pictured on May 4, has been converted from lawn to pollinator-friendly, native plants. (AP Photo/Julia Rubin)

  • This 2021 image provided by LeighAnn Ferrara shows Ferrara’s young son as he watches a rabbit on a grassy patch of his White Plains, N.Y., yard, which is surrounded by planting beds of flowers, vegetables and trees. Many people are converting parts of their grass lawns into more diverse plantings. (LeighAnn Ferrara/via AP)

  • A rowhouse in New Rochelle, N.Y., has a front yard full of flowers and other plants, while neighboring houses have lawns of grass. Many people are converting parts of their lawns into planting beds for a variety of flowers, perennials and edible plants. (AP Photo/Julia Rubin)

WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. — LeighAnn Ferrara is transforming her small suburban yard from grass bordered by a few shrubs into an anti-lawn — a patchwork of flower beds, vegetables and fruit trees.