Giant sharks once roamed the seas, feasting on huge meals

  • This photo provided by the Florida Museum of Natural History shows a Megalodon shark tooth, whose blade-like shape is ideal for preying on fleshy marine mammals, such as whales and dolphins. (Kristen Grace/Florida Museum of Natural History via AP)

  • This photo provided by the Florida Museum of Natural History in August 2022, shows a reconstructed jaw of Carcharocles megalodon, an extinct species of shark that lived about 23 to 3.6 million years ago. At around 50 feet (16 meters) from nose to tail, the megalodon was bigger than a school bus, according to a study published in the journal Science Advances on Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2022. That's about two to three times the size of today's great white shark. (Eric Zamora/Florida Museum of Natural History via AP)

  • This illustration provided by J. J. Giraldo depicts a 52-foot Otodus megalodon shark predating on a 26-foot Balaenoptera whale in the Pliocene epoch, between 5.4 to 2.4 million years ago. At background right, a 13-foot Carcharodon shark seizes an 8-foot juvenile of the whale pod. The giant megalodon shark that roamed the oceans millions of years ago could have devoured a creature the size of a killer whale in just five bites, according to a study published Wednesday in the journal Science Advances. (J. J. Giraldo/via AP)

NEW YORK — Today’s sharks have nothing on their ancient cousins. A giant shark that roamed the oceans millions of years ago could have devoured a creature the size of a killer whale in just five bites, new research suggests.