ACLU sues to stop Biden’s asylum ban on the US-Mexico border

The border between El Paso, Texas, and Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, June 8, 2024. The American Civil Liberties Union filed a lawsuit on Wednesday, June 12, challenging President Joe Biden’s decision to shut down the southern border to nearly all migrants seeking asylum in the United States. (Paul Ratje/The New York Times)

The American Civil Liberties Union filed a lawsuit on Wednesday challenging President Joe Biden’s decision to shut down the southern border to nearly all migrants seeking asylum in the United States.

The action is the first legal challenge to an order that the Biden administration hopes will decrease the number of illegal border crossings and neutralize one of the president’s most serious political vulnerabilities.

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In a statement, the ACLU said the asylum ban, which went into effect one week ago, violated legal protections for people seeking protection in the United States.

Biden’s order blocked access to asylum for migrants who cross the U.S.-Mexico border without authorization. President Donald Trump tried to cut off migration in a similar way in 2018, but the move was blocked in federal court.

“The asylum statute could not be clearer: that one must be able to seek protection regardless of where they enter the country, which is why the courts struck down Trump’s near-identical asylum ban and is undoubtedly why the Biden administration has acknowledged it may not be able to do this by unilateral executive fiat,” said Lee Gelernt, a lawyer with the ACLU who has challenged several immigration policies under the Biden and Trump administrations.

The lawsuit, which was also joined by groups including the National Immigrant Justice Center and the Center for Gender and Refugee Studies, was filed in federal court in Washington, D.C. It takes issue with the executive action broadly, as well as several more narrow restrictions that the administration has imposed, such as giving migrants only four hours to find a lawyer if they want to argue that they be granted an exception to the asylum ban.

The restrictions would lift only when the number of illegal crossings drops to fewer than 1,500 for seven days in a row and remains that way for two weeks. The numbers have not been that low in years; in December, there were some 10,000 illegal crossings every day. More recently, the figures have hovered around 3,000 crossings per day.

There are exceptions to the order, including for unaccompanied children and victims of human trafficking. People can also schedule an appointment to claim asylum using a Customs and Border Protection app.

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