Puako study simulates marine ecosystem management strategies

  • A recently published marine ecosystem study conducted at Pauko in South Kohala, pictured here, simulated a variety of management strategies to gauge their effectiveness for three ecosystem services — ecosystem structure and resilience, dive tourism and fisheries. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today, file)
  • A recently published marine ecosystem study conducted at Pauko in South Kohala, pictured here, simulated a variety of management strategies to gauge their effectiveness for three ecosystem services — ecosystem structure and resilience, dive tourism and fisheries. (Laura Ruminski/West Hawaii Today, file)
  • The reef is seen at Puako Bay. (Bo Pardau/Special to West Hawaii Today)
  • A turtle gets a good cleaning in Puako Bay. (Bo Pardau/Special to West Hawaii Today)
  • A turtle gets a cleaning in Puako Bay. (John Andersen/Special to West Hawaii Today)

KAILUA-KONA — For the tourism industry, coral reefs are an attraction. For fishermen, they’re a place of business. For a variety of marine species, they’re home.