US military faces crisis in Hawaii after leak poisons water

  • Lauren Wright shows a photo of a contaminated bottle of water taken from a tap near Pearl Harbor, left, and a clean bottle of water, right, on her phone in a Waikiki hotel room on Friday, Jan. 28, 2022 in Honolulu. The family is among thousands forced to leave their military housing because of jet fuel contamination in their water supply. Her Navy husband and three children ranging in age from 7 to 17 have spent two months living in hotels after water smelling like fuel started pouring out of faucets at their home near Pearl Harbor. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones)

  • Lauren Wright prepares to do laundry as her son, Jaxson Wright, 7, rests on a bag of clothes and her daughter, Gianna Wright, 13, does school work in a Waikiki hotel room on Friday, Jan. 28, 2022 in Honolulu. The family is among thousands forced to leave their military housing because of jet fuel contamination in their water supply. Her Navy husband and three children ranging in age from 7 to 17 have spent two months living in hotels after water smelling like fuel started pouring out of faucets at their home near Pearl Harbor. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones)

  • In this Aug. 26, 2019, photo provided by the U.S. Navy, Lt. Cmdr. Blake Whittle, fuel department director, NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center Pearl Harbor, briefs Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Operational Energy, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Energy, Defense Logistics Agency Energy Commander, Director of Operational Energy Policy and staff during a Red Hill Underground Fuel Storage Facility tour near Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The Navy is scrambling to contain what one lawmaker has called a "crisis of astronomical proportions" after jet fuel leaked from an 80-year-old Hawaii tank farm, seeped into a drinking water well and polluted the water streaming out of faucets in Pearl Harbor military housing. (Shannon Haney/U.S. Navy via AP)

  • FILE - Overhead lights illuminate a tunnel inside the Red Hill Underground Fuel Storage Facility in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on Jan. 26, 2018. Attorneys for the U.S. Navy on Wednesday, Feb. 2, 2022 appealed Hawaii's order that it drain massive tanks that store fuel in the hills above Pearl Harbor, saying the state wrongly concluded the tanks posed an imminent threat that requires immediate action. (U.S. Navy via AP, File)

  • In this Dec. 23, 2021, photo provided by the U.S. Navy, Rear Adm. John Korka, Commander, Naval Facilities Engineering Systems Command (NAVFAC), and Chief of Civil Engineers, leads Navy and civilian water quality recovery experts through the tunnels of the Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility, near Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The Navy is scrambling to contain what one lawmaker has called a "crisis of astronomical proportions" after jet fuel leaked from an 80-year-old Hawaii tank farm, seeped into a drinking water well and polluted the water streaming out of faucets in Pearl Harbor military housing. (Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Luke McCall/U.S. Navy via AP)

  • In this Dec. 11, 2021, photo provided by the U.S. Navy, Mobile Diving Salvage Unit One performs inspection and sampling of a water well near Pearl Harbor, Oahu, where U.S. Navy divers were trying to remove fuel from a water shaft at Red Hill. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Aja Bleu Jackson/via AP, File)

HONOLULU — A giant U.S. government fuel storage installation hidden inside a mountain ridge overlooking Pearl Harbor has provided fuel to military ships and planes crisscrossing the Pacific Ocean since World War II.